THE ONLY GREEK NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA ENGLISH ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΑ  
   

Home Page

Riverland

Editorial

International

Greece

Cyprus

National

Community

Culture

Archives

About Us

Contact Us

Links

 


Renmark Paringa Council


Ραδιοφωνικο ιδρυμα Κυπρου


Ελληνικη Ραδιοφωνια τηλεοραση

 

 

Large scale anti-austerity protests in Greece

 

December 2015

Striking Greeks took to the streets last week to protest austerity measures, setting Alexis Tsipras' government its biggest domestic challenge since he was re-elected in September promising to cushion the impact of economic hardship.

Flights were grounded, hospitals ran on limited staff, ships were docked at port and public offices stayed shut across the country in the first nationwide walkout called by Greece's largest private and public sector unions in a year.

As Greece's foreign lenders prepared to meet in central Athens to review compliance with its latest austerity conditions, thousands marched in protest at the relentless round of tax hikes and pension cutbacks that the foreign lenders want to impose.

Five years of tough economic measures since the first austerity deal was signed in 2010 have sapped economic activity and left about a quarter of the population out of work.

"My salary is not enough to cover even my basic needs. My students are starving," said Dimitris Nomikos, 52, a protesting teacher told reporters.

"They are destroying the social security system ... I don't know if we will ever see our pensions."

Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras came to power in January promising to end the austerity. He then accepted the unpopular terms imposed by Greece's lenders.

Under threat of expulsion from the euro, Greece in July accepted a three-year, 86-billion-euro ($93-billion) deal with strict conditions of further cutbacks.

Illustrating the political juggling act the prime minister is trying to pull off, his own Syriza party, in order to avoid isolation by the people, took part in last week's protests, saying industrial action strengthened the government's hand in talks with lenders.

Under the new deal with the IMF and the Central European Bank, after the passing of the new austerity measures in Greek Parliament last week, the big corporations will receive 12 billion euros, including 10 billion to recapitalise the top banks in Greece - which have in recent years been taken over by larger international banking corporations.

The new bills passed, include new rules on home foreclosures, giving the banks the ability to seize the primary residence of indebted households. They also include tax increases on farming products such as wine.

 

Greek Tribune

greektribune.com.au

 

 

The Cyprus
 News Agency



Lapithos

 
Designed & Developed by Michael Ppiros
  COPYRIGHT 2010 Greek Community Tribune All Rights Reserved